Live Smart, Live Simply,

Live Healthy, Live Your Bliss

#LPCLiveInspired

This year, the LPC Live Inspired campaign will teach our LPC neighbors how to save money, be organized, practice healthy living, and ways to express your passions! The campaign will include statistics, tips, and life-hacks that renters will find practical and useful in their day-to-day life.

Live Smart

#LPCLiveInspired Series

HOW TO Live Smart FINANCIALLY WITH EXAMPLES OF HOW TO PUT MORE COINS IN THAT PIGGY BANK!

Live Smart Infographic
Coffee
Spender
1,500
Spent Per Year
The average American spends roughly this amount per year on coffee alone if they drank a cup of coffee from a coffee shop every day.
Saver
Reduces To
364
They could reduce that number to as little as this amount per year if only they drank coffee at home.
Commute
Spender
1560
Spent Per Year
The average American spends this amount per year in gasoline.
Saver
Ways To Save
Walk to work at a conveniently close LPC community.
Keep tires inflated optimally.
Carpool with a co worker
Avoid speeding.
Routine maintenance to keep car’s gas use optimal
Utilize cruise control.
Remove unnecessary weight
Tighten gas caps - according to Car Care Council, an estimated 147 gallons of gas are lost to evaporation each year.
Meals
Spender
The average American spends this amount per year on food and drink (breakfast, lunch, dinner combined) when eating out.
3523
Spent Per Year
Gym - Membership Fees
58
Average Monthly Cost
39
Amount of gym membership money that goes to waste from under utilization
67
Percentage of people with gym memberships that never use them
Year In Spending
1,500
Coffee
Buying coffee daily
1,560
Gas
Average per year
3,523
Meals
Eating out
696
Gym
Memberships at
average price
7279
Spent Per Year
364
Coffee
Making coffee at home
1,170
Gas
Saving on gas (cut by 25%)
1,761
Meals
Eating in (cut eating out
expenses by 50%)
FREE
Gym
Working out in Lincoln Fitness center/running around the local neighborhood
3295
Spent Per Year
45
Savings Per Year

Live Simply

#LPCLiveInspired Series

HOW TO Live Simply BY DECLUTTERING, ORGANIZING, AND SIMPLIFYING YOUR SURROUNDINGS.

Live Simply Infographic

We Consume

2x

as many material goods as we did

50 years agoin the U.S.

300,000

  • Total Items Each
  • The average residence contains about this many items

On average our homes contain more televisions than people

$8 Billion

The home organization industry is now an $8,000,000,000 Industry, and even scarier - It's growing by 10% each year

  • 1
  • out
    of
  • 10

Americans rent off-site storage - the fastest-growing segment of commercial real estate over the past 4 decades

40%

According to the National Soap and Detergent Association, getting rid of clutter would eliminate this percentage of housework in the average home

23%

Harris Interactive reports this percentage of adults say they pay bills late (and incur fees) because they lose them

In a 2008 NAPO survey of 400 consumers nationwide, they said:

27%
Feel Disorganized
at work
91%
Would be more
effective & effecient
if their workspace was better organized
28%
Would save over
an hour per day
27%
Would save 31 - 60
minutes each day

When neuroscientists at Princeton University looked at people’s task performance in an organized versus disorganized environment they found that the results of the study showed that
physical clutter in your surroundings competes for your attention,
resulting in decreased performance and increased stress.

The same study found that
multiple stimuli
compete for
your
attention,
preventing you the ability to focus
all of your attention on your ability
to think clearly and creatively.

Results from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine show that
participants at risk of
hoarding disorder scored

significantly higher on the
Sleep Habits Survey (SH)

and on three subscales of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI).
These include: sleep latency; sleep disturbances and daytime disturbances.

Study by researchers at UCLA’s Center on Everyday Lives and Families (CELF) on the
relationship between 32 California families and the thousands of objects in their
homes found a link between high cortisol (stress hormone) levels in female home
owners and a high density of household objects.
"THE MORE STUFF, the MORE
STRESS
WOMEN FEEL."

When neuroscientists at Princeton University looked at people’s task performance in an organized versus disorganized environment they found that the results of the study showed that physical clutter in your surroundings competes for your attention, resulting in decreased performance and increased stress.

Results from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine show that participants at risk of hoarding disorder scored significantly higher on the Sleep Habits Survey (SH) and on three subscales of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). These include: sleep latency; sleep disturbances and daytime disturbances.

The same study found that multiple stimuli compete for your attention, preventing you the ability to focus all of your attention on your ability to think clearly and creatively.

Study by researchers at UCLA’s Center on Everyday Lives and Families (CELF) on the relationship between 32 California families and the thousands of objects in their homes found a link between high cortisol (stress hormone) levels in female home owners and a high density of household objects. "THE MORE STUFF, the MORE STRESS WOMEN FEEL."

Give Everything a Home

Make easy-to-access storage spaces for things you use all the time, and don’t let your storage spaces get cluttered. Be creative about finding places for things. In addition, as a BIG NO: never label a storage space as “Miscellaneous”!

Declutter Regularly

Find time each week to organize. Highly organized people make sure they find time every week, or more, to organize their things. Stuff does not stay organized on its own; it needs to be reorganized continuously and consistently.

Keep Only What You Need

People who live organized lives only keep what they need and what they really really want. Having fewer things also means that you enjoy those things more and feel better about using everything you own, rather than letting half of what you own collect dust.

Know Where to Discard Items

Less stuff means less clutter. Donate things you haven’t used in over a year to thrift stores and clothing drives. Sell items on Craigslist, eBay, or list them on your apartment community’s classifieds.